Last edited by Faemi
Saturday, April 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of Mediaeval Latin and French bestiaries. found in the catalog.

Mediaeval Latin and French bestiaries.

Florence McCulloch

Mediaeval Latin and French bestiaries.

  • 209 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by The University of North Carolina Press in Chapel Hill .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Physiologus

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesUniversity of North Carolina studies in the Romance languages and literatures -- no.33
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13963962M


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Mediaeval Latin and French bestiaries. by Florence McCulloch Download PDF EPUB FB2

Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries Book Description: This is the first Mediaeval Latin and French bestiaries. book study of bestiaries, mediaeval works that described and illustrated animals, birds, and other creatures. Overview. This is the first English-language study of bestiaries, mediaeval works that described and illustrated animals, birds, and other creatures.

Florence McCulloch describes the nature of the Latin Physiologus, which is frequently cited as Author: Florence Mcculloch. This is the first English-language study of bestiaries, mediaeval works that described and illustrated animals, birds, and other creatures.

Florence McCulloch Mediaeval Latin and French bestiaries. book the nature of the Latin Physiologus, which is frequently cited as among the earliest examples of serious works of natural history. Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries; Florence McCulloch ; Book; Published by: The University of North Carolina Press; Series: North Carolina Studies in the Romance Languages and LiteraturesCited by: Summary: This is the first English-language study of bestiaries, mediaeval works that described and illustrated animals, birds, and other creatures.

Florence McCulloch describes the nature of the Latin Physiologus, which is frequently cited as among the earliest examples of serious works of. Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries. A Medieval Book of Nature Lore/ tr. by Michael J. Curley — Chicago&London: University of Chicago Press, () "Oxford English Reference Dictionary" — L.: Oxford University Press, (14).

described in the Latin and French bestiaries. In this chapter under alphabetically arranged subjects these traits are presented in their approximate chronological order,1 except for Pierre de Beauvais' non-bestiary material, which has been relegated to the Appendix.

The common Latin and French names are given Mediaeval Latin and French bestiaries. book well as any conspic-Cited by: Home › Библиография › Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries McCulloch F.

Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries — Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, () Название. Book I of De bestiis et aliis rebus is an Aviarium, a book on birds; since the birds were covered in Book I, the compiler of Book II did not include most of them, and so the Book II text contains only two birds (pelican and caladrius).

The manuscripts all date from the late thirteenth century. Clark (p. Animals tumble, soar, and race through the pages of the bestiary, a popular type of medieval book describing the beasts of the world. Mediaeval Latin and French bestiaries. book Abounding with vibrant and fascinating images, the bestiary brought real and fantastical creatures to life for readers.

So cherished were these vividly imagined beasts, they often “escaped” from manuscripts to inhabit other art works made during the medieval.

"Animal Skins and the Reading Self in Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries is an innovative analysis of how medieval bestiaries are apprehended by their readers--visually, intellectually, and emotively. Kay's focus on skin works brilliantly to link the bestiaries' literal and figurative content to its material expression on animal : Kindle.

It has been more than fifty years since the last major consideration of medieval Latin and French bestiaries was published. Kay brings us up to date in the archive, and contributes to current discussions among animal studies theorists, manuscript studies scholars, historians of the book.

Mediaeval Latin and French bestiaries. book Jan M. Ziolkowski, Talking Animals: Medieval Latin Beast Poetry, (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, ; Series: Middle Ages Series) [Book] Mediaeval Latin and French bestiaries.

book Florence McCulloch, Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, ; Series: Studies in the Romance Languages and Literatures, 33) [Book]. This is a list of medieval bestiaries. Latin bestiaries First family These French bestiaries. The French bestiaries are all derived from works with commonly attributed authorship, and are divided as such: Bestiaire in Verse by Philippe de Thaon.

Bestiaries: Additional Physical Format: Online version: McCulloch, Florence. Mediaeval Latin and French bestiaries. Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina Press [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors /.

In medieval Europe, bestiaries were extremely popular and respected by all who consulted it. 1 After the Church appropriated it for its own purposes around the 6th century, the bestiary became a book of learning which used examples of animal lore to teach Christian values.

Mixing fact and fiction with a dab of moralization, bestiaries became. This book explores the relations between humans and other animals as they appear to a reader of medieval bestiaries, given that almost all of them are realized as parchment books and that parchment, although made from animal skin, looks much like human skin.

Using Didier Anzieu’s concept of the Skin Ego and a theory of reading as assuming a second skin, the book explores how a supposedly. Animal skins and the reading self in medieval Latin and French bestiaries.

Introduction: skin, suture, and caesura. Book, word, page. Garments of skin. Orifices and the library. Cutting the skin: sacrifice, sovereignty, and the space of exception.

The riddle of recognition. In this extraordinary study of medieval bestiaries, Sarah Kay has written: a) a history of the tradition, beginning with the Greek Physiologus and extending to Latin and French translations and adaptations from the twelfth to mid-thirteenth centuries; b) a philosophical enquiry regarding the human-animal divide; c) an art historical study of the manuscript folio, written as it is on skin; d) a.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for North Carolina Studies in the Romance Languages and Literatures: Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries No. 33 by Florence T.

McCulloch (, Paperback) at the best online prices at eBay. Free shipping for many products. English bestiaries and their beasts Stowe Royal 12 C. xix Royal 12 F. xiii Harley Harley Latin bestiary manuscripts at the British Library. As indicated by the evidence from surviving books and medieval book lists, the Latin bestiary enjoyed its greatest popularity from the late twelfth to the late thirteenth centuries.

Référence(s): P iquette Kathryn E. & W hitehouse Ruth D. — Writing as Material Practice. Substance, Surface andUbiquity Press,p., bibl. Kay Sarah — Animal Skins and the Reading Self in Medieval Latin and French o-London, The University of Chicago Press,p., index, : Alexandros Tsakos.

Sarah Kay's exploration of French and Latin bestiaries offers fresh insight into how this prominent genre challenged the boundary between its human readers and other animals.

Bestiaries present accounts of animals whose fantastic behaviors should be imitated or avoided, depending on the given trait. Trans. T.H. White, The Book of Beasts (), pp. with amendments from MS texts. The passage appears in "second family" MSS, which apparently originated in early 12th century Northern France and England; of.

McCullough, Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries (), pp. Read "Animal Skins and the Reading Self in Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries" by Sarah Kay available from Rakuten Kobo.

Just like we do today, people in medieval times struggled with the concept of human exceptionalism and the significance Brand: University of Chicago Press. This combined attention to abstract and material aspects of bestiaries makes this study really remarkable."--The Medieval Review "Animal Skins and the Reading Self in Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries is an innovative analysis of how medieval bestiaries are apprehended by their readers--visually, intellectually, and emotively.

Kay's focus on Format: Hardcover. McCulloch F. Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries (). This contains a full list of the literature. This contains a full list of the literature. Pliny, Natural History Book XXXVII, trans. z, London works Search for books with subject Bestiaries. Search. Not In Library.

Physiologus Theobaldus Episcopus. Not In Library. Not In Library. Read. Read. Not In Library. Not In Library. Borrow. Mediaeval Latin and French bestiaries Florence McCulloch Not In Library. Read. Bestiarios del Libro ultramarino Isabel Muñoz Not In Library. Bestiary. Willene B. Clark, A Medieval Book of Beasts.

The Second-family Tradition. Commentary - Arts - Text and Translation (Woodbridge: Boydell, ). Florence McCulloch, Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, revised ed.

The books in question were bestiaries, and one of their purposes, interestingly, in a contemplative order, was to facilitate the creation of sermons memorable for both preacher and : Bobbi Dykema.

Animal Skins and the Reading Self in Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries eBook: Sarah Kay: : Kindle Store. Animal skins and the reading self in medieval Latin and French bestiaries / Sarah Kay. Format E-Book Published Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, © Description 1 online resource.

URL Access for [Bloomington] - (Available on campus and off campus with authorized logon) Other contributors ProQuest (Firm) Notes. This chapter concerns bestiaries’ relationship to the book of nature and the book of scripture.

In Confessions Augustine describes how the process of reading clothes readers in a second skin that can be identified simultaneously with the Bible and with the natural world; the same conjunctions are performed by medieval parchment.

Drawing on Derrida’s commentary on Genesis and Agamben’s on. Medieaval Latin and French Bestiaries. ; rev. ed., Chapel Hill, NC: Ultra-scholarly. Actually has good introduction on Greek bestiaries as a predecessor the Medieval Latin and French.

Good manuscript information regarding which "families" of texts descended from which sources. Medieval Latin and French Bestiaries. University of North Carolina Studies in the Romance Languages and Literatures, no.

Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, After a good description of the history of the Greek and Latin Physiologus and Latin and French bestiaries, the text includes material from the bestiary with sources.